Where are you based?

 

Why do I need an editor?

 

Are your rates flexible?

 

What is the difference between proofreading and copyediting?

 

I want to make sure my manuscript doesn’t have any mistakes, but I don’t want to lose my writing voice. How do I know you will provide solid editing while making sure my work still sounds like me?

 

 

Where are you based?

 

I live and work in Minneapolis, but all of my services can be done remotely.

 

 

Why do I need an editor?

 

All computers have spell-check. You’re conscientious about your grammar. You’ve had your text looked over by friends or employees. So why hire an editor?

 

It allows you to concentrate on the meat, not the mechanics. Particularly with longer pieces, hiring an outside editor means that you can focus on shaping the story of your novel or the substance of your thesis without worrying about the nitty-gritty of grammar and sentence structure.

 

It’s impossible to view your own work objectively. It’s amazing how well our brains can read what we think we’ve written rather than what’s actually on the page. Let someone with a fresh pair of eyes make sure your writing is what you’ve intended.

 

 

Are your rates flexible?

 

The prices on this website represent my average rates. If your project demands a lighter or heavier edit than average, these rates can be adjusted accordingly. If your budget is limited, talk to me about paying in installments or possible options for reduced rates..

 

 

What is the difference between proofreading and copyediting?

 

Copyediting checks for correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, word usage, and consistency. It also addresses more minor style and clarity issues and, in nonfiction, fact-checking on basic, readily available information (the name of a country’s president or the correct way to refer to a particular corporation).

 

Proofreading is the last step in the editorial process and makes sure that no last-minute mechanical errors, like typos, have made it through to the final version of a piece. In cases where a copyedit or other editing has been done, a proofread makes sure that any errors flagged by that editor were correctly implemented into the text. For printed publications, a proofread also checks that page references are correct and looks for layout issues, such as stacked words (the same word in the same position on successive lines); widows and orphans (a single lonely line of a paragraph at the beginning or end of a page); and text that’s too loose or too tight.

 

 

I want to make sure my manuscript doesn’t have any mistakes, but I don’t want to lose my writing voice. How do I know you will provide solid editing while making sure my work still sounds like me?

 

This is one of the most common concerns writers have about hiring an editor. You’ve been working on your manuscript for weeks, months, or years, and you don’t want someone to swoop in and make wholesale changes to the text. This is a big reason many authors choose to self-publish.

 

My aim is to give your work only the kind of attention you want for it and I’m not here to stamp out the originality from your writing. I recognize that just because something is grammatically incorrect, that doesn’t necessarily mean it has to change, and I will not do anything to the style aspect of your manuscript unless that is part of what you hire me to do.

 

All of this is why the initial consultation for a project is so important. It allows you to lay down exactly what you want addressed and what you want left alone. This is also why I offer the “try before you buy” option, where I will edit a sample of your work at no cost or obligation. If you’re happy with my work, great! I’ll do the whole thing. If not, we can address any miscommunication that might have happened during the initial consultation—or you might decide that I’m simply not the editor for you. You won’t owe me a thing.

 

 

Still have questions? Ask away.